Autumn is an enchanting time of year in Georgia. As the trees’ colors change and the air gets colder, you may find yourself more tempted than ever to go for a relaxing drive through the fall scenery. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that driving in autumn comes with its own set of obstacles that drivers must be aware of to avoid serious accidents. Here are a few ways you can stay safe on the roads this season:

Watch out for leaves

When fallen leaves begin to clutter the streets, it can create new hazards for motorists. Wet leaves on roadways can be just as slippery as ice and cause your tires to lose traction. Leaves can also obscure traffic lines or other pavement markings that make navigating the roads more challenging. Take it slow while driving this autumn and maintain a safe following distance behind other vehicles.

Anticipate driving in darkness

After Daylight Savings Time ends, it’s not uncommon for many drivers to find themselves commuting to and from work in the dark. According to the National Safety Council, driving in the dark compromises a driver’s depth perception and peripheral vision. Driving in the dark can be especially hazardous in the fall when there may be slick leaves or frost on the roads that you might not see.

Check your tire pressure

Cold fall temperatures can cause air pressure in tires to drop rapidly. For every 10 degrees the temperature drops, your tires will lose one pound per square inch of pressure. If you park your car outside, you’ll want to get in the habit of checking your tire pressure regularly to ensure you get to your destination smoothly and safely.

Be cautious in fog, frost or damp conditions

It’s not uncommon to encounter inclement weather as the air begins to cool down in the fall. Whether it be rain, fog or frost, you’ll want to practice extra caution when driving in these conditions. Fog can drastically reduce your visibility, and wet or frozen roads can cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Be especially careful when driving over a bridge or overpass, as these surfaces usually freeze before roadways.